What is Lasik?

Have you wondered exactly what is Lasik? If you’ve been prescribed glasses or contact lenses, chances are that your optometrist has listed Lasik as an option. Lasik is a type of laser eye surgery that can correct most vision issues: nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatisms, and difficulty reading for people over 40. It corrects the shape of the cornea to help sharpen images without the help of glasses or contacts. This surgery has been performed for over thirty years and is safe, pain-free, and has a very short recovery time.

Am I eligible for Lasik?

Ideal candidates for this procedure are at least 18 years old, have a stable prescription that hasn’t changed more than 1.0 in a year, and has a vision prescription between -14.0 and +6.0. However, only a consultation with an ophthalmologist can determine whether or not a patient is eligible for Lasik.

What is Lasik’s procedure?

The procedure itself is very simple and doesn’t take more than eight to twelve minutes total. Patients use eye drops to numb each eye and the surgeon creates a ring of blue dye around the cornea as a reference point. Then, the surgeon uses a microkeratome, a precise vacuum-like instrument, to cut a small flap of corneal tissue and shines a laser to reshape the cornea to fix the condition of the patient. The surgeon puts back the flap in its original position and the tissue begins to heal immediately. To help the healing process, patients are given daily eye drops for the following weeks. When asked what is Lasik recovery like, ophthalmologists say patients regain vision within just a day or two of walking out of the operation room.

What is Lasik?
A cool beam of light is applied underneath the corneal flap.

What are the risks with this surgery?

Lasik eye surgery is very low risk, however, a few patients do get dry eyes. This can generally be fixed through hydrating eye drops or in severe cases patients can get an implant that slows the draining of tears. Each of these procedures are painless, comfortable, and can last up to a few years depending on the implant the patient is eligible for.

Taylor Clarke